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Umbilical Cord Blood

Umbilical Cord Tissue

Stem Cell Research and Treatments

Costs of Family Saving

the Family Saving Process

Birth and Health Care Professionals

Popular Questions

  • How common is stem cells banking?

    There are today more than 300 stem cell banks, 200 private and 100 public, in more than 50 countries. In many states in the United States, it is mandatory to inform about the possibility of family-saving umbilical cord blood. Cellaviva is the first private stem cell bank in Sweden, but the concept is well established around the world.

  • What is cord blood?

    Cord blood comes from a newborn's umbilical cord and is collected immediately after birth. Once the umbilical cord has been clamped and cut, the remaining blood in the umbilical cord is drawn into a collection bag.

  • How does the collection of the umbilical cord blood work?

    When the baby is born and the umbilical cord is cut, the midwife or Cellaviva staff collects the cord blood using a special collection bag. The cord is wiped with antiseptic and a needle is inserted into one of the veins in the umbilical cord, and the blood is allowed to flow freely into the collection bag. The procedure is painless, easy and takes 3-5 minutes. The delivery continues as usual with the placenta coming out. During the procedure, the baby is placed with the mother, skin against skin.

  • Who collects the cord tissue?

    The collection of umbilical cord tissue is simple and can be done by anybody. In the Cellaviva box, instructions are found on how to clean the umbilical cord, how to cut (10 – 20 cm), then place it in a tissue can and cover with saline.

  • Who collects the cord blood?

    The collection of umbilical cord blood is done immediately after clamping. The collection is performed by the midwife or the Cellaviva staff and is completely painless and risk free for mother and baby. The cord blood, the umbilical cord and the placenta, is otherwise thrown away and treated like medical waste unless the mother expresses the desire to take care of it.

  • Is there any risk to the mother or baby when collecting stem cells at birth?

    There are no risks for the mother or baby to collect stem cells from the after birth. The placenta and the umbilical cord do not fill any function for the baby or mother after the umbilical cord has been cut. The procedure must not under any circumstances compromise the safety of the mother, the baby or any other person at the obstetrics clinic. It is always the midwife who decide whether it is appropriate to collect stem cells.

  • How are stem cells collected?

    Hemopoietic stem cells, or blood stem cells, are found in bone marrow and umbilical cord blood and can be extracted in various ways. Umbilical cord blood is the blood that remains in the placenta and the umbilical cord after a childbirth. Generally it is thrown away as medical waste. Umbilical cord blood contains stem cells that are capable of replacing other cells. The advantage of umbilical cord blood is that it has not been as affected by the environment. The cells have divided a few times and the genetic material is in very good condition. There is only one chance to collect these precious stem cells and it is at birth. Collecting stem cells from umbilical cord is riskfree and painless for mother and baby.

  • What type of stem cells are collected?

    The umbilical cord blood contain mainly hematopoietic or blood stem cells. Blood stem cells can develop into white and red blood cells as well as platelets. Blood stem cells are found in the bone marrow and in the umbilical cord blood.

  • Where are stem cells located?

    Stem cells are found in different places in our bodies, for example, in the bone marrow, brain and teeth. We have stem cells throughout the body, but there are few tissues that have as high density stem cells as the umbilical cord and placenta.

  • Which clinics cooperate with Cellaviva?

    We have contacted all clinics in Sweden. Our hope is to cooperate with all clinics and offer Cellaviva’s services throughout Sweden. We offer trainings to all staff at obstetrics and maternity care in how the collection is done. Please contact us if you have any questions regarding the collaboration with the clinic where you plan to give birth.

  • Does Cellaviva compete with the national blood bank for umbilical cord blood?

    In many countries, both public and private biobanks co-exist and they work well together. We feel that our biobank is complementary. The national umbilical cord blood bank’s need for donations is less than 1% of the births, and family saving is approx 2-5% of births in countries comparable to Sweden. Donation is possible at two different hospitals, but family saving can be done throughout Sweden, provided the clinic is willing to help the parents with the collection of the blood.

  • Who is the licensor?

    The Health and Social Care Inspectorate (IVO) is the licensor and regularly inspects Cellaviva. We comply with high quality requirements to ensure that the handling of stem cells is performed satisfactorily and of high quality. The quality and routines are according to the tissue laws.

  • What about the research?

    There is research in a variety of treatment areas and diseases, such as diabetes, cerebral palsy, autism and brain damage. More than 200 clinical studies on stem cells from umbilical cord blood and umbilical cord tissue are estimated to aim at finding new treatments for regenerative and transplant medication. Read more here

  • How are stem cells from the umbilical cord used for treatments today?

    It is now a well-established therapy for treating various blood disorders, such as leukemia. Over 80 diseases are treated today with stem cells from umbilical cord blood – several, however, are quite unusual diseases.

  • What are the chances for the collected stem cells to be used in the future?

    Nobody can answer that, but there is a lot of research in the field around the world. Hal E. Broxmeyer, who was part of the research team that performed the world’s first successful transplant with stems cells from cord blood in the late 1980s, later established a private biobank in the United States. Broxmeyer has published hundreds of scientific articles regarding umbilical cord blood, including 10 in 2016. Many researchers, like the pioneer Hal E. Broxmeyer, believe family saving can be useful, while others believe that the evidence is not yet sufficient.

  • Is it possible for the father/partner to cut the umbilical cord?

    It is possible. The collection of the cord blood is then performed by the midwife or the Cellaviva staff. If the partner wants to collect the umbilical cord tissue, it is possible if he/she has studied the instruction carefully before.

  • How do I use the service of Cellaviva?

    The Cellaviva box, ordered by the parents, contains everything needed for the collection of stem cells from both the umbilical cord blood and cord tissue. The Cellaviva box also contain information, agreement, consent and health declaration. The mother needs to fill in the documents as soon as possible and send them back to Cellaviva.

  • The midwife has promised to help with the collection, can I be sure that it will work?

    There is much that can happen during a birth and it is the midwife´s overall assessment at each individual delivery, which determines whether a collection is possible. The collection must under no circumstances compromise the safety of the mother, the baby or any other person. The midwife has the full confidence of Cellaviva and it is always the midwife who decide if it is appropriate to collect umbilical cord blood. Collection of umbilical cord tissue is not time-critical in the same way and can in principle always be carried out.

  • Is it possible to delay cord clamping and still collect the cord blood?

    Yes. The parents decide, in consultation with the midwife, the time for cord clamping. However, we must be clear that the blood volume that can be collected depends on the time of clamping. Most of our customers wait 1-2 minutes before clamping. 

  • What are the chances that the collected stem cells will be used in the future?

    Nobody can answer that, but there is a lot of research in the field around the world. Hal E. Broxmeyer, who was part of the research team that performed the world’s first successful transplant with stems cells from cord blood in the late 1980s, later established a private biobank in the United States. Broxmeyer has published hundreds of scientific articles regarding umbilical cord blood, including 10 in 2016. Many researchers, like the pioneer Hal E. Broxmeyer, believe family saving can be useful, while others believe that the evidence is not yet sufficient. Cells from the cord tissue is currently not used in any treatments today. The reason to family save stem cells is a positive view of medical development. Who knows what treatment methods are available in the future.